How to Make Limoncello

img_8909I’ve always loved the taste of lemons—lemon ice, lemonade, lemon tart, lemon cookies. You get the idea. Maybe that’s why I enjoy limoncello. It’s light, sweet and very refreshing, and especially welcome at the end of a hot summer day.

The lemon liqueur originated in southern Italy nearly a hundred years ago. Then, it was customary for the wealthiest Sorrento families to offer limoncello to their distinguished guests.

While the Sorrento-made limoncello is my favorite and has the most authentic taste, the homemade kind can be just as delicious. The secret to the unique flavor is to use lemons that are grown in certain areas of Southern Italy. But living on Long Island, those are hard to come by.  Instead, we chose medium-size lemons, grown locally. And it came out delicious!

Homemade limoncello is easy to make and something that can be served at your backyard barbecues. They make for great gifts, too!

Interested in making some? See the recipe below.  And if you do make it, please let me know how yours turns out!

Saluté.

 

Limoncello Recipe:

Ingredients:

  • 11 lemons (medium size; you’ll only be using the peels)
  • 750 ml grain alcohol 95% proof or higher (or vodka)
  • 3 cups water
  • 3 cups sugar

Directions:

  • Step 1: Peel strips of lemon with a peeler, avoiding the pith (the inside can be used for other purposes). Add lemon peel and alcohol to a large container (glass is best) with a lid. Seal. Let stand at room temperature in a cool dark place for one week. This will allow the flavors from the peel to infuse into the liquid.
  • Step 2: Bring 3 cups of water to a boil. Slowly, stir in the 3 cups of sugar, one at a time, until completely melted. Let cool to room temperature; add sugar mixture to the container with the lemon peel and alcohol. Refrigerate for one day.
  • Step 3:  Strain out lemon peels and pour into individual bottles. Store in the freezer. Enjoy!

What’s great about this recipe is you can save the lemons to make another batch.

 

5 Tips to Keep Your Dog Calm and Safe During Fireworks

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I was going to wait until closer to July 4th to write about this, since most pets run away around that time of year more than any other. But with Memorial Day weekend upon us—not to mention my crazy neighbors that look for any excuse to set off fireworks—I figured there was no better time than the present.

Over the years, Emma has gone from ignoring fireworks as a puppy to being absolutely terrified as an adult dog. In the last few years, though, she’s gotten much better in dealing with the loud sounds. However, she’s far from ignoring them, as she once did.

Unlike hunting dogs, most dogs have not been desensitized to loud noises. Most likely, your canine companion will not be a fan of the fireworks and will need some extra comforting, as well.

img_8152When dogs hear fireworks, they experience internally something similar to what we do when we are surprised by a sudden loud noise—a rush of adrenaline and increase in heart rate. Now, as humans, we are quick to realize the sudden noise is nothing to worry about. But dogs don’t grasp that same concept.

Whether this is the first time or the hundredth time your dog will be exposed to fireworks, here are a few things that will help keep her calm and safe during the celebrations:

  1. Exercise your dog earlier in the day. Go for long walks and give her extra play time. That way, she will be tired and in a calmer state when the fireworks begin.
  2. This is a no-brainer but keep your dog inside during the fireworks. And make sure you or another human is there to offer comfort. Dogs should not be alone during fireworks. If it’s hot out, crank up the AC.
  3. Create a safe space. Sometimes, dogs will want to hide under the bed or curl up in their crate when they are afraid. Give them access to small, cozy places and put a blanket or shirt that you wore earlier in the day next to them, so they have your scent close. A chew toy is also a good way to keep them busy and distracted.
  4. Stay calm. If your dog is anything like mine during fireworks, she will probably pant, pace and whine. I know that if I hold Emma in my arms, it helps her calm down quicker. During this time, I’ll play white noise on the Sonos with the volume up to drown out the fireworks. This combo works best for Emma.
  5. Be sure your dog is wearing current ID tags and is microchipped in case she gets spooked and runs off unexpectedly. That way, if anyone finds her, you’ll be sure to get a call as to her location.

Hopefully, your neighbors aren’t like mine and won’t set off too many fireworks this weekend! With all the dogs living in my neighborhood, you would think they would be more considerate to those little canine ears, right?!

Do you do anything special to help your pet get through the fireworks? I’d love to hear about it.

Hope everyone has a safe and fun Memorial Day weekend!